The following excerpt comes from a piece originally published on the blog “The Common Law.” The full text is available here

Like consumers of many modern services, law students are becoming accustomed to a personalized, individualized experience; the “one size fits all” path of attending a prestigious law school, taking black letter law classes, and going to a large law firm will not satisfy the desires of the student of tomorrow.

As students in this generation think critically about the institutions that play an important role in shaping society, law schools must adapt and become more attentive to the individual needs of students.

One possibility is that schools can make student-led seminars a requirement for graduating, or at the very least do more to make students aware that they have the ability to develop their own courses focused on their unique interests. The result may be that students experience a greater feeling of control over their education. This also may facilitate a more interactive learning environment where students focus their energies on the quality of the learning experience rather than preparation for a three-hour final exam.

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